HomeFocus AreasStatistics & Assessment

Statistics & Assessment

American Antiquarian Society Digital Collections

American Antiquarian Society Digital Collections is one of eight case studies used in Searching for Sustainability: Strategies from Eight Digitized Special Collections (PDF)  (by Nancy L. Maron, Sarah Pickle, and Deanna Marcum), an article published in November 2013 by ARL and Ithaka S+R and funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Case Study (PDF)

 
 

Orphan Works and Mass Digitization Roundtables: Myths and Realities of Copyright and Fair Use

orphans-home-atchison-kansas-1911-postcardOrphans’ Home, Atchison, Kansas, 1911, image © Thiophene GuyOn March 10–11, 2014, the US Copyright Office convened roundtables on orphan works and mass digitization. Several participants attacked fair use and libraries, misstated the purpose of the copyright system in the United States, or inaccurately portrayed the activities of HathiTrust. An ARL Policy Notes blog post examines some of these misconceptions, or myths, cited at the roundtables and responds to these inaccuracies. An earlier ARL Policy Notes blog post recaps the roundtable discussions, which covered best practices, fair use, licensing solutions, and the issue of whether orphan works and mass digitization need to be treated separately.

 
 

Strategies to Sustain Digitized Special Collections: Ithaka S+R/ARL Web Seminar Video and Q&A Online

A A S Vigilantes of Montana posterVigilantes of Montana poster, courtesy American Antiquarian SocietyMuseums and libraries are taking advantage of advances in technology to move their rare and unique collections online. What most institutions learn quickly is that digitization is the easy part. As grant funding rarely covers ongoing operations, the larger challenge is to develop a successful strategy to make sure the digitized collections remain accessible and relevant over time.

 
 

Strategies to Sustain Digitized Special Collections: Key Lessons from Ithaka S+R/ARL Report “Searching for Sustainability”

A A S Vigilantes of Montana posterVigilantes of Montana poster, courtesy American Antiquarian SocietyMuseums and libraries are taking advantage of advances in technology to move their rare and unique collections online.  What most institutions learn quickly is that digitization is the easy part. As grant funding rarely covers ongoing operations, the larger challenge is to develop a successful strategy to make sure the digitized collections remain accessible and relevant over time.

 
 

Strategies to Sustain Digitized Special Collections: Key Lessons from Ithaka S+R/ARL Report “Searching for Sustainability”

A A S Vigilantes of Montana posterVigilantes of Montana poster, courtesy American Antiquarian SocietyMuseums and libraries are taking advantage of advances in technology to move their rare and unique collections online.  What most institutions learn quickly is that digitization is the easy part. As grant funding rarely covers ongoing operations, the larger challenge is to develop a successful strategy to make sure the digitized collections remain accessible and relevant over time.

 
 

Searching for Sustainability: Strategies from Eight Digitized Special Collections

Searching for Sustainability report coverA report and eight cases studies by Nancy L. Maron, Sarah Pickle, and Deanna Marcum. Published November 2013 by ARL and Ithaka S+R. Funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

The report aims to address one of the biggest challenges facing libraries and cultural heritage organizations: how to move their special collections into the 21st century through digitization while developing successful strategies to make sure those collections remain accessible and relevant over time.

Report (PDF)

Case studies:

See also the video of the January 2014 web seminar with ARL, Ithaka S+R, and speakers from the eight case studies presented in the Searching for Sustainability report.

 
 

SPEC Kit 335: Digital Image Collections and Services (August 2013)

SPEC Kit 335 examines how research libraries and their parent institutions have responded to the transition from analog to digital images and the growth of digital images available from commercial vendors and/or created within institutions or their libraries. The survey gathers information about current practices relating to the development and management of institutional digital image collections and the acquisition and use of licensed image databases. It explores the infrastructure and support provided by research libraries and/or their institutions for the creation and use of digital images in teaching, learning, and research, including systems and platforms, cataloging and metadata, access and training, services and service points, and copyright and other rights issues. It also identifies collaborative strategies among ARL member institutions for providing digital images. The SPEC Kit includes examples of digital image collection websites, finding aids, image use training materials, copyright and use rights policies, selection policies, descriptions of digital image service points, and digital collection promotional materials.

This publication is available for purchase in both print and online versions. Download the spec-kit-purchase-options-2013.pdf  for complete pricing and purchase options information.

Link to the online SPEC Kit 335 on the ARL Digital Publications website.

 
 

Membership Meeting 1999 (Spring): Strategic Issues in Digitization Initiatives in Special Collections

"Strategic Issues in Digitization Initiatives in Special Collections," by Frances Groen, presented at the 134th ARL Membership Meeting, Kansas City, Missouri, and Lawrence, Kansas, May 12–14, 1999.

pdf mm99sp-groen.pdf

 
 

Strategies to Sustain Digitized Special Collections: Key Lessons from Ithaka S+R/ARL Report “Searching for Sustainability”

A A S Vigilantes of Montana posterVigilantes of Montana poster, courtesy American Antiquarian SocietyMuseums and libraries are taking advantage of advances in technology to move their rare and unique collections online.  What most institutions learn quickly is that digitization is the easy part. As grant funding rarely covers ongoing operations, the larger challenge is to develop a successful strategy to make sure the digitized collections remain accessible and relevant over time.

 
 

Appraising Our Digital Investment: Sustainability of Digitized Special Collections: Webcast

This March 7, 2013, webcast presented by ARL and Ithaka S+R provides an overview of the recent report of the same name (PDF) as well as community responses to the findings. Speakers include Judy Ruttenberg (ARL), Nancy Maron (Ithaka S+R), Lisa Carter (Ohio State University), Anne Kenney (Cornell University), Ann Thornton (New York Public Library), and Sarah Pickle (Ithaka S+R).

 
 
Page 2 of 5
 
 

Partners

Coalition for Networked Information Logo
Library Copyright Alliance Logo
The Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) Logo