HomeFocus AreasSHared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE)

Special Collections and Archives

ARL-SAA Digital Archives Specialist Courses in Chicago: Early-Bird Deadline Approaching

image by C. William Brubaker, © UICTuesday, August 13, is the last day to register at early-bird rates for the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) courses being offered by ARL and the Society of American Archivists (SAA) at the University of Illinois at Chicago, September 9–13. You do not need to work at an ARL library to register for the courses at this site—they are open to all librarians and archivists.

 
 

ARL-SAA Digital Archives Specialist Courses 2013 Open for Registration

Digital Archives SpecialistRegistration is now open for the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) courses being offered by ARL and the Society of American Archivists (SAA) at four ARL member libraries through 2013. Dates are being finalized for course offerings at seven additional ARL libraries in 2014.

 
 

Library Assessment Conference 2010 Papers Featured in EBLIP

eblip-journal-logoEBLIPFifteen articles about a range of assessment activities in academic libraries are featured in the latest issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP vol. 8, no. 2). An editorial by Martha Kyrillidou and Damon Jaggars summarizes the themes of these papers selected from the 2010 Library Assessment Conference proceedings.

 
 

ARL, SAA Partner to Offer Digital Archives Specialist Courses at ARL Libraries

digital-archives-specialist-das-logoDigital Archives SpecialistARL is working with the Society of American Archivists (SAA) to offer Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) courses targeted for staff in ARL member institutions. ARL and SAA will deliver four DAS courses back-to-back in a single week, traveling across 11 different ARL host libraries over the next 18 months.

 
 

Appraising Our Digital Investment: Sustainability of Digitized Special Collections: Webcast

This March 7, 2013, webcast presented by ARL and Ithaka S+R provides an overview of the recent report of the same name as well as community responses to the findings. Speakers include Judy Ruttenberg (ARL), Nancy Maron (Ithaka S+R), Lisa Carter (Ohio State University), Anne Kenney (Cornell University), Ann Thornton (New York Public Library), and Sarah Pickle (Ithaka S+R).

 
 

Appraising our Digital Investment: Sustainability of Digitized Special Collections in ARL Libraries

While many research libraries have begun to digitize their collections and share best practices around the steps required to create digital content, much less is known about what happens post-launch. Building on previous research by Ithaka S+R that defined key aspects of sustainable digital content, Appraising our Digital Investment: Sustainability of Digitized Special Collections in ARL Libraries offers a first look at the practices, attitudes, costs, and revenues associated with caring for digitized special collections. The report shares results from a survey conducted on the sustainability of digitized special collections at ARL member institutions.

pdf digitizing-special-collections-report-21feb13.pdf

 
 

ARL and Ithaka S+R Release Findings on Sustainability of Digitized Special Collections

jack-kerouac-manuscript-photo-by-thomas-hawkPhoto of Jack Kerouac manuscript, image © Thomas HawkARL and Ithaka S+R today released Appraising our Digital Investment: Sustainability of Digitized Special Collections in ARL Libraries (PDF), a report on findings from an ARL-Ithaka S+R survey of ARL libraries on the range of activities and expenses that libraries undertake to support their digitized special collections.

 
 

Home Videos, Herd Books, Math Journals, & Parliamentary Papers How Historians of Science and Technology Find Primary Sources: Preliminary Results from a Semi-Structured Interview Study

Poster presented at the LCDP Luminary Class, June 2012. The decisions that academic libraries and special collections make today, in a context of rapid technologicaland other change, will shape the research of historians of the future. Certain types of primary sources of special interest to historians of science and technology—including scientific texts, journal literature, archival documents of research institutions, and manuscript papers of scientists and engineers—are often stewarded by academic libraries, with particular responsibility assumed by science- and technology-focused institutions. Recent trends in collection development and management will have major implications for tomorrow's scholars. What does it mean for both current and future historians of science and technology that more and more sources are full-text searchable online, and that more and more print sources are stored off-site? Will scholars be affected by libraries licensing rather than owning digital content? Will today's born-digital counterparts to yesterday's paper publications, documents, and images be accessible? Are research libraries and special collections currently capturing and preserving the same kinds of primary sources that historians of science and technology have relied on, and are there other kinds of sources we should be preserving?

pdf lcdp-2012-poster-baildon-michelle.pdf

 
 
Page 5 of 13
 
 

Partners

Coalition for Networked Information Logo
Library Copyright Alliance Logo
The Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) Logo