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Letter to FCC in Protecting an Open Internet

A May 13, 2014 ex parte to the Federal Communications Commission concerning preserving a protecting the open Internet in support of education, research, and innovation.

pdfletter-ALA-ARL-EDU-to-FCC-final-12may2014.pdf

 
 

Net Neutrality Comments Filed with FCC by Higher Education and Library Coalition

On July 18, 2014, a coalition of higher education and library organizations—including ARL—filed comments urging the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to protect and promote the open Internet.

pdfcomments-NN-library-highered_NN-18jul2014-final.pdf

 
 

Net Neutrality Principles

On July 10, 2014, ARL along with 10 other higher education and library organizations released a joint set of Net Neutrality Principles they recommend form the basis of an upcoming Federal Communications Commission (FCC) decision to protect the openness of the Internet. The groups believe network neutrality protections are essential to protecting freedom of speech, educational achievement, and economic growth.

pdfhigher-ed-libraries-net-neutrality-principles-10July2014.pdf

pdfhigher-ed-libraries-net-neutrality-press-release-and-principles-10July2014.pdf

 
 

Coalitions Support Leahy’s USA FREEDOM Bill for Surveillance Reform

telephone with sticker that says image © François Proulx

This week, ARL joined two groups of organizations that engage on privacy and surveillance issues in letters to US Congressional leadership expressing support for the compromise version of the USA FREEDOM Act introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) on July 29, 2014 (S. 2685). The July 29 letter focuses on the enhanced transparency provision (PDF) and the July 30 letter addresses the bill more comprehensively (PDF). Both letters urge Congress to act swiftly and pass the new version of the bill, without any dilution or amendment. 

 
 

Library, Higher Education Organizations File Net Neutrality Comments with FCC

electronic-superhighway-by-nam-june-paik“Electronic Superhighway” by Nam June Paik, image © The QToday, July 18, 2014, ARL, together with 10 other library and higher education groups, filed comments with the FCC on net neutrality (PDF). These comments largely expand on the points made in the Net Neutrality Principles jointly filed by library and higher education groups on July 10, going into greater detail and making specific suggestions to strengthen the proposals made in the FCC’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

 
 

Higher Education, Library Groups Release Net Neutrality Principles

electronic-superhighway-by-nam-june-paik“Electronic Superhighway” by Nam June Paik, image © The QToday, July 10, 2014, higher education and library organizations representing thousands of colleges, universities, and libraries nationwide released a joint set of Net Neutrality Principles (PDF) they recommend form the basis of an upcoming Federal Communications Commission (FCC) decision to protect the openness of the Internet. The groups believe network neutrality protections are essential to protecting freedom of speech, educational achievement, and economic growth.

 
 

Letter to FCC in Support of an Open Internet

On February 13, 2014, in a letter to the Chairman and the Commissioners of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the American Library Association (ALA), and EDUCAUSE signaled their disappointment with the recent DC Circuit Court of Appeals decision to vacate the “no blocking” and “no discrimination” rules for public Internet access set forth by the FCC in 2010.

pdf ltr-fcc-net-neutrality-13feb2014.pdf

 
 

ARL Joins Coalition in Advocating for Surveillance Reform

telephone with sticker that says image © François Proulx

On June 18, 2014, ARL joined 36 organizations that engage on privacy and surveillance issues in a letter (PDF) to US Senate leadership expressing concerns with the version of the USA FREEDOM Act passed by the US House of Representatives on May 22 (H.R. 3361). The legislation was originally intended to limit the Government’s ability to conduct bulk collection of records. The letter notes that, before a vote on the House floor, last-minute changes were made that resulted in half of the bill’s co-sponsors withdrawing their support and voting against the bill because it was significantly weakened and lacked clarity.

 
 
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