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In the Matter of Preserving the Open Internet Broadband Industry Practices

Comments of the Association of Research Libraries, EDUCAUSE, Internet2, NYSERNet, and ACUTA in support of rulemaking to preserve the openness of the Internet.

pdf comments-open-internet-broadband14jan10.pdf

 
 

In the Matter of Preserving the Open Internet Broadband Industry Practices

Comments from ARL, ALA, and EDUCAUSE in support of rulemaking to preserve the openness of the Internet.

pdf comments_fccpublicnotice_12oct10.pdf

 
 

In the Matter of Global Free Flow of Information on the Internet

Comments from the Center for Democracy and Technology highlight the importance of liability protections for online intermediaries and the way these protections serve to maintain the Internet as a robust platform both for the free flow of information and for trade.

pdf cdt-comments-openaccess-06dec10.pdf

 
 

Federal Communications Commission v. AT&T: Amicus brief in support of FCC

Brief of Amici Curiae Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics In Washington, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the American Civil Liberties Union, the American Library Association, the Association of Research Libraries, the National Security Archive, and Openthegovernment.Org in Support of Petitioners.

pdf amicus-fcc-v-att-16nov10.pdf

 
 

In the Matter of Preserving the Open Internet Broadband Industry Practices: Comments of the Open Internet Coalition

The Open Internet Coalition ("OIC") submits the following comments in response to the Federal Communications Commission's October 22, 2009, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking ("NPRM" or "Notice"), FCC No. 09-93.

pdf oic-nn-comments_final.pdf

 
 

Letter to Julius Genachowski re: Open Internet (Oct. 21, 2009)

Letter expressing support for the recent announcement that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will begin a public proceeding that will ensure an open and nondiscriminatory Internet.

pdf lt-pubint-nn-21oct09.pdf

 
 

In the Matter of Digital Broadcast Copy Protection

Comments arguing that a broadcast flag rule adopted by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) could effectively limit the public's access to information, and impair its ability to use content in new and innovative ways.

pdf broadcast-flag-commentssept07.pdf

 
 

American Library Association, et al., v. Federal Communications Commission and United States of America (2005)

This case arises out of events related to the nation's transition from analog to digital television service ("DTV").

pdf bfappealsruling0505.pdf

 
 

ALA, et al. v. FCC: Reply Brief

Reply brief concerning the Federal Communications Commission broadcast flag mandate.

pdf broadcast-flag-reply-2004.pdf

 
   

Letter to Jim Sensenbrenner, Jr. and W.J. "Billy" Tauzin re: "Database and Collections of Information Misappropriation Act" Discussion Draft (Sept. 8, 2003)

Letter from the Net Coalition regarding the "Database and Collections of Information Misappropriation Act" ("Discussion Draft" or "Draft"), specifically several provisions that would be unnecessarily punitive to the Internet community but would exceed other similar federal statutes.

pdf lt-netcoalition-databases-08sep03.pdf

 
 

Comments of The American Library Association, The Association of Research Libraries, and EDUCAUSE in the Matter of Framework for Broadband Internet Service

The American Library Association (ALA), the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), and EDUCAUSE welcome the FCC's Notice of Inquiry (NOI) proposing a "third way" forward on the difficult question of regulatory authority over broadband Internet access service.

pdf third-way-comments_071510.pdf

 
 

The Digital Millenium Copyright Act: Highlights of New Copyright Provision Establishing Limitation of Liability for Online Service Providers

One of the principal provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act ("DMCA") is a limitation on the potential money damages that Online Service Providers ("OSPs"), including libraries and educational institutions, could face when they function like a common carrier, allowing online users access to copyrighted material placed there by someone else. Rather than confront huge financial claims if the third party material infringes someone's copyright, OSPs can escape liability provided they comply with these new rules.

pdf dmca-highlights-limitation-of-liability.pdf

 
 

Testimony of Laura N. Gasaway, Concerning Promotion of Distance Education Through Digital Technologies (Jan. 27, 1999)

Testimony on distance education given on behalf of the Association of American Universities, the American Council on Education, and the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges.

pdf distance-ed-testomony-gasaway.pdf

 
 

Testimony of James G. Neal, Concerning Promotion of Distance Education Through Digital Technologies (Jan. 26, 1999)

Testimony on distance education given on behalf of the Association of American Universities, the American Council on Education, and the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges.

pdf neal-testimony-distance-ed-26jan99.pdf

 
 

Library OSP Letter to the House and the Senate re: On-line service providers' liability for copyright infringement (Mar. 30, 1998)

Letter from library and higher education organizations thanking Congressional representatives for their attention to assuring that any statute designed to clarify the limit of an on-line service provider's liability for copyright infringement appropriately accommodates the unique nature of libraries.

pdf hatch-osp-letter-30mar98.pdf

 
   

FCC Issues Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Net Neutrality

electronic-superhighway-by-nam-june-paik“Electronic Superhighway” by Nam June Paik, image © The QAt an open meeting held on May 15, 2014, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) considered the issue of “Protecting and Promoting the Open Internet,” or net neutrality. The FCC voted on—and passed by 3-2—a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), which proposes new rules in accordance with the decision of the Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit that overturned the FCC’s 2010 Open Internet Rules regarding anti-discrimination and anti-blocking. The FCC seeks comments, due July 15, 2014, on a wide range of topics including the appropriate scope of the rules, whether paid prioritization should be banned outright, and what legal authority provides the most effective path to protecting an open Internet.

 
 

FCC to Consider Revised Net Neutrality Rules

electronic-superhighway-by-nam-june-paik“Electronic Superhighway” by Nam June Paik, image © The QThe Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is once again trying to propose network neutrality rules that would assure an open Internet, though early press reports based on a draft proposal indicate that more work needs to be done to achieve network neutrality. In its January 2014 decision in Verizon v. FCC, the DC Circuit Court of Appeals struck down previous FCC rules on network neutrality. The FCC will consider new rules on May 15. The proposed rules will then be subject to public comment and will be carefully reviewed by many communities, given the possible impact on free speech, innovation, online learning, and more. ARL, the American Library Association (ALA), and EDUCAUSE have been collaborating on network neutrality issues and will continue to work with the FCC and other communities as the proposed rules are publicly considered. 

 
 

FCC Grants One-Year Waiver of E-Reader Accessibility Requirement

image © Terry MadeleyOn January 28, 2014, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) granted a one-year waiver exempting e-readers from the requirement that equipment used for advanced communication services (ACS) be accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities. The FCC granted the waiver in response to a petition filed by the Coalition of E-Reader Manufacturers, but limited the waiver to only one year despite the coalition’s request for an indefinite waiver. In the order granting the waiver (PDF), the FCC stated:

 
 

Two Bills Seek to Address NSA Surveillance Practices

phone with sticker that says This Phone Is Tappedimage © François ProulxThe continuous release of information concerning the US National Security Agency’s (NSA) surveillance practices has led to increased scrutiny by Congress. Two bills have been introduced that seek to address some of the NSA surveillance practices and address serious privacy concerns. First, Sen. Feinstein (D-CA) introduced the FISA Improvement Act of 2013 (PDF) that was approved by the Select Committee on Intelligence on October 31. The bill was not made publicly available until after the committee’s approval. The second, a bicameral and bipartisan bill, the USA Freedom Act of 2013 (PDF), was introduced by Rep. Sensenbrenner (R-WI) and Sen. Leahy (D-VT) on October 29. This bill seeks to rein in the NSA’s bulk collection, analysis, and storage of Americans’ electronic communications. ARL with others in the public and private sectors support the USA Freedom Act of 2013.

 
 

FCC to Decide E-Reader Waiver Petition by January 28

image © Terry MadeleyOn October 22, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau announced that the FCC needs more time to review a petition requesting a waiver for certain e-reader devices to be exempt from the FCC’s advanced communications accessibility requirements. The petition was filed by the Coalition of E-Reader Manufacturers. The Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau issued an order (PDF) granting a temporary waiver from the accessibility requirements for certain e-readers until January 28, 2014. During this temporary waiver period, the FCC will evaluate the merits of the petition and decide whether to grant or deny the waiver request. For more background, read about the reply comments ARL submitted to the FCC in September 2013 opposing the waiver.

 
 
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