HomeFocus AreasStatistics & Assessment

Statistics & Assessment

ARL Annual Salary Survey 2005-2006

This report analyzes salary data for all professional staff working in the 123 ARL member libraries during 2005–06. Data were reported for 9,655 professional staff in the 113 university libraries and for 3,921 professional staff members at the 10 nonuniversity libraries at ARL member institutions.

This publication is available for purchase in both online and print versions. Download the arl-salary-survey-purchase-options-2013.pdf for complete pricing and purchase options information.

Link to the online ARL Annual Salary Survey 2005-2006 on the ARL Digital Publications website.

 
 

ARL Annual Salary Survey 2007-2008

This report analyzes salary data for all professional staff working in the 123 ARL member libraries during 2007-08. Data are reported for 9,983 professional staff in the 113 university ARL libraries and for 3,797 professional staff in the 10 non-university ARL libraries.

This publication is available for purchase in both online and print versions. Download the arl-salary-survey-purchase-options-2013.pdf for complete pricing and purchase options information.

Link to the online ARL Annual Salary Survey 2007-2008 on the ARL Digital Publications website.

 
 

ARL Annual Salary Survey 2009-2010

This report analyzes salary data for all professional staff working in the 124 ARL member libraries during 2009–2010. Data are reported for 10,207 professional staff in the 114 university ARL libraries and for 3,811 professional staff in the 10 non-university ARL libraries.

This publication is available for purchase in both online and print versions. Download the arl-salary-survey-purchase-options-2013.pdf for complete pricing and purchase options information.

Link to the online ARL Annual Salary Survey 2009-2010 on the ARL Digital Publications website.

 
 

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship Program Accepting Applications

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship Program videosThe Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is currently accepting applications for postdoctoral fellowships. CLIR postdoctoral fellows work on projects that forge and strengthen connections among library collections, educational technologies, and current research. The program offers recent PhD graduates the chance to help develop research tools, resources, and services while exploring new career opportunities. Host institutions benefit from fellows' field-specific expertise by gaining insights into their collections' potential uses and users, scholarly information behaviors, and current teaching and learning practices within particular disciplines.

 
 

Workforce Transformation: Possible Library Futures

I have held a series of administrative positions at Oklahoma State University (OSU) since 1978 and have been dean of libraries since 2004. During that time we have experienced a number of changes and in 2012 the OSU Library looked to be thriving. We had adopted technology to enhance collections and improve services. We had been a development partner with Summon and were in a similar role with Intota. We consistently received positive survey results and comments for our services and collections. Our building was heavily used by students. For most of my staff and many of my librarians, the library looked healthy and robust. We were clearly not stagnant, but I had a strong sense that many librarians had not yet acknowledged how precarious our future was in research libraries. Staff members who did not have opportunities to attend professional meetings or the time to read the professional literature were unaware of the danger we were in. They did not fully comprehend how the transformations in technology, scholarly communication, and higher education would change their work, nor did they recognize how the competitive challenges from Google and others could make our traditional services irrelevant.

 
 

ARL Annual Salary Survey 2006-2007

This report analyzes salary data for all professional staff working in the 123 ARL member libraries during 2006–07. Data are reported for 9,824 professional staff in the 113 university ARL libraries and for 3,832 professional staff in the 10 non-university ARL libraries.

This publication is available for purchase in both online and print versions. Download the arl-salary-survey-purchase-options-2013.pdf for complete pricing and purchase options information.

Link to the online ARL Annual Salary Survey 2006-2007 on the ARL Digital Publications website.

 
 

ARL Annual Salary Survey 2008-2009

This report analyzes salary data for all professional staff working in the 123 ARL member libraries during 2008-2009. Data are reported for 10,148 professional staff in the 113 university ARL libraries and for 3,748 professional staff in the 10 non-university ARL libraries.

This publication is available for purchase in both online and print versions. Download the arl-salary-survey-purchase-options-2013.pdf for complete pricing and purchase options information.

Link to the online ARL Annual Salary Survey 2008-2009 on the ARL Digital Publications website.

 
 

Barbara Dewey Receives Multicultural Leadership Award

barbara-deweyBarbara I. Dewey, image © Penn StateThe Pennsylvania State University’s Council of College Multicultural Leadership (CCML) recently presented Barbara I. Dewey, dean of university libraries and scholarly communications at Penn State, the Award for University Administration at the 2014 Way Pavers Award Luncheon hosted by CCML. The award honors Dewey for supporting diversity initiatives that have positively enhanced student life and the climate throughout the college and local community, while maintaining a high level of character and leadership.

 
 

Workforce Transformation: Communities of Practice as Tools for Organizational Change and Self-directed Professional Development

Last year, ARL’s New Role for New Times report, Transforming Liaison Roles in Research Libraries (PDF), by Janice M. Jaguszewski and Karen Williams, identified six trends in the organization and practices of leading research libraries and the changing work of liaison librarians. One of those trends is the effort by research libraries to “create and sustain a flexible workforce.” Building a flexible workforce includes a variety of methods to “transform” a library’s workforce, including hiring new staff with new expertise, as well as committing to develop a more agile “legacy workforce.” (p. 14)

 
 

Workforce Transformation: Adding Value beyond Discovery

For centuries, library work has been about building collections, and then managing them. More recently, the emphasis shifted to discovery and access, which in turn led to an emphasis on instruction and information literacy initiatives. In some sense, one could create a cogent argument that the combination of services and collections will sustain our work for the foreseeable future. However, it also seems that this same argument will not facilitate innovation or necessarily help us provide the much-needed shift to “value beyond discovery.”

 
 
Page 22 of 23
 
 

Partners

Coalition for Networked Information Logo
Library Copyright Alliance Logo
The Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) Logo