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2000–2004

Memorandum re: Removal or Destruction of Federal Depository Library Documents (Mar. 13, 2002)

In October 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey requested that the Government Printing Office instruct Federal Depository Libraries that received a CD-ROM on characteristics of large surface-water supplies in the United States to destroy their copies. Shortly thereafter, the Superintendent of Documents ordered those libraries participating in the Federal Depository Library Program to withdraw this item and immediately destroy it. Subsequently, the Federal Bureau of Investigation visited several Federal Depository Libraries to determine whether that order had been carried out. This occurred without consultation with the GPO or the Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.). This series of events, and the prospect that in the wake of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack there may be additional requests for removal or destruction of federal materials by Federal Depository Libraries (FDLs), raises a number of questions of interest and importance to librarians. This memorandum sets forth below, in a question-and-answer format, the answers to many of those questions.

pdf susman_fdlp_march02.pdf

 
 

Celebrating Seventy Years of the Association of Research Libraries,1932–2002

Compiled by Lee Anne George and Julia Blixrud • 2002 • ISBN 0-918006-95-3 • 40 pp.

This publication features a sweeping overview of the major issues addressed by ARL’s programs in its first seventy years. Also included are a reprint of the entertaining speech by David Stam of Syracuse University, “Plus ça Change: Sixty Years of the Association of Research Libraries;” a chronology of significant events; and a list of ARL members and leaders from 1932 to 2002.

pdf celebrating-seventy-years-arl.pdf

 
 

In the Matter of Digital Broadcast Copy Protection

Comments arguing that a broadcast flag rule adopted by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) could effectively limit the public's access to information, and impair its ability to use content in new and innovative ways.

pdf broadcast-flag-commentssept07.pdf

 
   

The Humanist: "Dances with Wolves" or "Bowls Alone"?

This paper discusses informal scholarly communication in the humanities; ways in which information technology can influence the content of scholarly communication without necessarily changing its outward forms; and an emerging genre of scholarly communication in the humanities, one that is native to the Web, and raises some interesting challenges for the disciplines. Presented at "Scholarly Tribes and Tribulations: How Tradition and Technology Are Driving Disciplinary Change," October 17, 2003.

pdf scholarly-tribes-unsworth-17oct03.pdf

 
 

Scholarly Tribes and Tribulations: How Tradition and Technology Are Driving Disciplinary Change [annotated bibliography]

In 2003, ARL convened a group of scholars, librarians, information technologists, and administrators to explore how the disciplines and sub-disciplines are approaching the use of technology.

pdf scholarly-tribes-bibl-dec03.pdf

 
 

Global Changes in Scholarly Communication

This paper addresses some of the strategic issues that relate to the traditional system of scholarly communication by looking at changes in informal and formal communication between scholars and scientists and at emerging spaces that scholars are using to conduct and to disseminate the results of their research. Originally presented at e-Workshops on Scholarly Communication in the Digital Era, August 11-24, 2003. Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, it was preliminary reading for the Scholarly Tribes and Tribulations conference in October 2003.

pdf scholarly-tribes-thorin-17oct03.pdf

 
 

Special Collections in ARL Libraries

Until this 1998 survey, no systematic data had been collected on special collections in ARL libraries for nearly 20 years. The results of this survey provide a snapshot of these collections at the end of the twentieth century and identify areas for further investigation.

pdf special-collections-arl-libraries.pdf

 
 

Supplemental Comments of the American Association of Law Libraries, the American Library Association, the Association of Research Libraries and the Special Libraries Association on the Second Draft Consolidated Texts of the Free Trade Area of the America

Supplemental comments in response to the notice and request for public comments on the Second Draft Consolidated Texts of the Free Trade Area of the Americas Agreement (FTAA), December 27, 2002. These comments supplement those previously submitted by AALL, ALA and other organizations, and address, in particular, the FTAA provisions on copyright within the section on intellectual property rights

pdf ftaa-lib-assoc-supp-comments-nov03.pdf

 
 

Amicus Brief in Support of Tasini

Brief Amici Curiae of ALA and ARL.

pdf tasiniamici.pdf

 
 
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