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Register.com v. Verio: Revised Amici Curiae Brief (March 1, 2001)

Amici submit this brief urging that this Court reverse the decision of the trial court (in Register.com v. Verio) which effectively prohibits the copying of facts from a publicly accessible website. Amici represent the interests of many sectors of the computer, software, Internet telecommunications, and information services industries, as well as users of digital information.

pdf amicus-revised-register-verio-01mar01.pdf

 
 
     

The Digital Millenium Copyright Act

On October 12, 1998, Congress passed the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), a complex piece of legislation which makes major changes in U.S. copyright law to address the digitally networked environment. This memorandum discusses the law's five titles.

pdf band-dmca-memo-16aug01.pdf

 
 

The Digital Millenium Copyright Act: Highlights of New Copyright Provision Establishing Limitation of Liability for Online Service Providers

One of the principal provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act ("DMCA") is a limitation on the potential money damages that Online Service Providers ("OSPs"), including libraries and educational institutions, could face when they function like a common carrier, allowing online users access to copyrighted material placed there by someone else. Rather than confront huge financial claims if the third party material infringes someone's copyright, OSPs can escape liability provided they comply with these new rules.

pdf dmca-highlights-limitation-of-liability.pdf

 
 

Summary of International Copyright and IP Activities

At the urging of the United States, a new "digital agenda" recently has been added to the range of issues under consideration in a long-running series of negotiations convened by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). Currently, the U.S. is pressing for the early conclusion of international agreements on a number of issues as to which the Congress has yet to legislate and the U.S. copyright community remains deeply divided. In the longer term, this effort to shape global intellectual property policy before achieving domestic consensus could have the unintended consequence of jeopardizing both the U.S. leadership role in the field and the interests of U.S. copyright-related industries and institutions.

pdf summary-intl-ip-2001.pdf

 
   
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