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Library Copyright Alliance Supports Orphan Works Reform

Orphan works are works whose copyright owners cannot be identified and located. Libraries and archives possess millions of orphan works in their collections, in the form of photographs, letters, manuscripts, drawings, and older books. These works often have great historic and cultural significance. However, because the copyright owners cannot be located, libraries cannot obtain the rights holders' permission to make these works widely available to the public. This leaves libraries on the horns of a dilemma. Libraries can either disseminate the works and face the risk of the copyright owners demanding statutory damages and injunctive relief; or leave the works in archives, where few people can see them.

pdf orphanworkslcasupports.pdf

 
 

The Digital Millenium Copyright Act: Highlights of New Copyright Provision Establishing Limitation of Liability for Online Service Providers

One of the principal provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act ("DMCA") is a limitation on the potential money damages that Online Service Providers ("OSPs"), including libraries and educational institutions, could face when they function like a common carrier, allowing online users access to copyrighted material placed there by someone else. Rather than confront huge financial claims if the third party material infringes someone's copyright, OSPs can escape liability provided they comply with these new rules.

pdf dmca-highlights-limitation-of-liability.pdf

 
 

Orphan Works Legislation

The orphan works legislation is intended to enable someone, after conducting a "qualifying search" for the owner, to use an orphan work--a copyrighted work whose owner cannot be located.

pdf owlegislation.pdf

 
 

Part II: Detailed Responses to Section 108 Working Group Questions

The American Library Association and the Association of Research Libraries convened a workshop to consider and receive additional input from members of the library and archival communities regarding the deliberations of the Section 108 Study Group. The Section 108 Study Group is examining the exceptions and limitations available to libraries and archives under Section 108 of the Copyright Act and considering changes to better meet the needs of libraries and archives in the digital environment.

pdf part-ii-detailed-responses-to-section-108-working-group-questions.pdf

 
 
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