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Georgia State University E-Reserves Case: Eleventh Circuit Endorses Flexible Approach to Fair Use

Georgia State University LibraryGSU Library
image © Jason Puckett
On Friday, October 17, 2014, the US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit issued its ruling in the Georgia State University (GSU) case concerning the use of excerpts of academic books for electronic course reserves. The Eleventh Circuit reversed and remanded the decision to the district court. In doing so, the court upheld the importance of the flexible application of fair use. Importantly, the Eleventh Circuit did not rule on whether each of the uses by GSU were fair uses or not, but instead found fault with the district court’s methodology, which used bright-line rules and an arithmetic approach (i.e., if three of the four factors favor fair use, then the use is fair). Assuming that litigation goes forward rather than the case being settled, the district court will need to revisit its fair use analysis, but could potentially again find that GSU’s uses were fair use for most of the works at issue.

For a more detailed analysis of the October 17 ruling, see “In Georgia State University E-Reserves Case, Eleventh Circuit Endorses Flexible Approach to Fair Use,” on the ARL Policy Notes blog.

 
 

Videos Show Value of Code of Best Practices in Fair Use

greg-cram-fair-use-code-videoGreg Cram on NYPL’s use of the CodeToday, October 21, 2014, ARL released three videos on the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries, a clear and easy-to-use statement of reasonable approaches to fair use of copyrighted material, developed by and for librarians who support academic inquiry and higher education. With generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the new videos capture how the Code has assisted many communities by providing helpful guidance about the scope of best practice when fair use comes into play.

 
 

Video: "Code of Best Practices Interview: Peter Jaszi and Brandon Butler"

American University law professors Peter Jaszi and Brandon Butler discuss the development and roll-out of the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries. (16 minutes)

 
 

Video: "Code of Best Practices Interview: Peter Jaszi and Patricia Aufderheide"

American University professors Peter Jaszi and Patricia Aufderheide discuss the development of the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries. (11 minutes)

 
 

Video: "Code of Best Practices in Fair Use at the New York Public Library"

In this four-minute video, Greg Cram of the New York Public Library discusses NYPL's application of the principles of fair use.

 
 

Library Copyright Alliance Files Amici Brief in Authors Guild v. Google

screenshot of Mrs Dalloway in Google BooksGoogle BooksOn July 8, 2014, the Library Copyright Alliance (LCA)—the American Library Association (ALA), Association of Research Libraries (ARL), and Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL)—filed an amici brief (PDF) in the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Authors Guild v. Google in favor of Google’s transformative use in creating Google Book Search (GBS). The Southern District of New York previously ruled in favor of Google, finding that GBS provided significant public benefits and constituted fair use.

 
 

Authors Guild v. HathiTrust: Implications for Libraries

open-book-folded-pagesimage © Thomas HawkJonathan Band, policybandwidth and legal counsel to the Library Copyright Alliance (LCA), released on July 7, 2014, an analysis of the recent Authors Guild v. HathiTrust decision, “What Does the HathiTrust Decision Mean for Libraries?” (PDF). As Band notes, “The decision has implications for libraries that go far beyond the specific facts of the case. This paper offers some preliminary thoughts on what these implications may be.” The paper reviews several issues including mass digitization and storage, access to works, suggestions concerning other forms of access, and associational standing. Band concludes:

 
 

White v. West Publishing 2014 Decision

In July 2014, the district court issued its full memorandum and order in White v. West Publishing, explaining that three of four fair use factors weighed in favor of a finding of fair use while the remaining factor was neutral. 

pdfWhite-v-west-publishing-decision-3jul2014.pdf

 
 
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