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Section 108

Jim Neal's Supplemental Testimony for Hearing on Preservation and Reuse of Copyrighted Works

James G. Neal, Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian for Columbia University in the City of New York, testified at the April 2, 2014 Hearing on Preservation and Reuse of Copyrighted Works for the Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet. This is his supplemental testimony, which expands upon some issues that came up in the hearing.

pdf testimony-supplement-Jim-Neal-9apr2014.pdf

 
 

Jim Neal's Written Testimony for Hearing on Preservation and Reuse of Copyrighted Works

James G. Neal, Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian for Columbia University in the City of New York, testified at the April 2, 2014 Hearing on Preservation and Reuse of Copyrighted Works for the Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet. This is his written testimony.

pdf testimony-jim-neal-2apr2014.pdf

 
 

Authors Guild v. Hathi Trust Amicus Brief

In their motion for partial judgment on the pleadings, Plaintiffs in Authors Guild v. HathiTrust advance a radical and unprecedented interpretation of 17 U.S.C. § 108 that threatens the most routine library operations.

pdf amicus-hathi-trust-20apr12.pdf

 
 

Library Copyright Alliance Statement on Copyright Reform

In the wake of Judge Chin's rejection of the Google Books Settlement, there has been a renewed interest in legislative solutions to a variety of copyright issues affecting libraries, including those implicating the mass digitization of books, the use of orphan works, and the modernization of 17 U.S.C. §108 (particularly preservation). The Library Copyright Alliance, comprised of the American Library Association (ALA), the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), has several general comments on possible efforts to address these issues via legislation.

pdf lca_copyrightreformstatement_16may11.pdf

 
 

Membership Meeting 2008 (Spring): Section 108 Study Group

Proceedings of the 152nd ARL Membership Meeting, May 2008.

pps mm08sp-neal.pps

 
 

Letter to Rasenberger Re: Section 108 (April 24, 2008)

Comments from ALA and ARL on the Section 108 Study Group efforts.

pdf rasenberger-108-letter-24apr06.pdf

 
 

Library Preservation: Changes Incorporated in H.R. 2281, The Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 (PL 105-304)

Addresses changes to Section 108 of the Copyright Act due to passage of the Digital Millenium Copyright Act.

pdf dmca-section108-changes.pdf

 
 

ALA and ARL Response to the Section 108 Study Group Regarding Interlibrary Loan and Other Copies for Users

pdf section108study-libresponse26feb07.pdf

 
 

Detailed Responses to Section 108 Working Group Questions

The Section 108 Study Group released a Background Paper and requested comments on issues relating to library and archival exceptions under Section 108. The library community provided written and oral statements to the Study Group. Based on the additional input from the library community, the responses in this document provide greater detail and in some instances, clarify the earlier statements filed in conjunction with the March Roundtables and the request for comment by the Study Group.

pdf section108-working-group-2006.pdf

 
 

Part II: Detailed Responses to Section 108 Working Group Questions

The American Library Association and the Association of Research Libraries convened a workshop to consider and receive additional input from members of the library and archival communities regarding the deliberations of the Section 108 Study Group. The Section 108 Study Group is examining the exceptions and limitations available to libraries and archives under Section 108 of the Copyright Act and considering changes to better meet the needs of libraries and archives in the digital environment.

pdf part-ii-detailed-responses-to-section-108-working-group-questions.pdf

 
 

The ALA and ARL Position on Access and Digital Preservation: A Response to the Section 108 Study Group

In response to issues raised by initiatives such as the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP), in spring 2005 the U.S. Copyright Office and the Library of Congress convened the Section 108 Study Group. The Study Group is charged to investigate whether Section 108 of the Copyright Act, which grants exceptions to libraries and archives, should be updated to better address the use of digital technologies and networked-based resources.

pdf dig-preservation-study-response-09nov06.pdf

 
 

Letter to Mary Rasenberger re: Section 108 Study Group (Apr. 24, 2006)

Based on discussions during the Los Angeles, CA and Washington, D.C. roundtables, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the American Library Association (ALA) submit the following additional comments on the Section 108 Study Group efforts.

pdf ltr-rasenberger-108-24apr06.pdf

 
 

Letter to Rasenberger Re: Section 108 (February 22, 2006)

pdf ltr-rasenberger-108-22feb06.pdf

 
 

Letter to Mary Rasenberger re: Section 108 Study Group (Feb. 22, 2006)

The Association of Research Libraries and the American Library Association request that Sherrie Schmidt, Arizona State University, and Ken Frazier, Director, University of Wisconsin, Madison, participate in the Section 108 Study Group Roundtable Discussions in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.

pdf ltr-rasenberger-108-22feb06.pdf

 
 

Memorandum re: Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998

This memo will address an issue that has arisen regarding interpretation of Section 108(a)(3) of the Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. §108(a)(3), as amended in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 ("DMCA").

pdf dmca-section108-memo-081999.pdf

 
 

Primer on the Digital Millenium: What the Digital Millenium Copyright Act and the Copyright Term Extension Act Mean for the Library Community

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act ("DMCA"), which is the centerpiece of the legislative strategy for the Clinton Administration and Congressional leaders responsible for copyright bills, was passed in the closing days of the 105th Congress. It is a very complex Act, which generated controversy and left unfinished business in its wake. As a result, high on the list of "must-dos" for the 106th Congress will be issues leftover from the DMCA.

pdf primer-digital-millenium1999.pdf

 
 
 
 

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