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Synergy Issue 7, September 2011

The theme for this issue is “research” and how libraries are supporting these endeavors in higher education and becoming invaluable partners in the enterprise. 2000-2001 Leadership and Career Development (LCDP) Fellow, Angela Lee (University of Washington) discusses current trends in data curation and management, specifically in the context of health sciences librarianship at her institution. Also in the health sciences arena, Myra Morales, 2009-2011 Diversity Scholar, defines Community Based Participatory Research and the role that the research librarian can play in this new paradigm – from support for or engaging in the methodology – to providing preservation services for the data collected. Last, Minglu Wang (Career Enhancement Fellow, 2009) speaks about her experience as the newly appointed data services librarian at the John Cotton Dana Library of Rutgers University. Wang makes the case for library and information professionals insinuating themselves into research projects much earlier in the process in order to help researchers develop more efficient and comprehensive data collection and management plans. All three of these authors provide solid evidence of the value that library and information science professionals bring to their organizations, and of the significant contributions that former ARL Diversity Programs participants are making to the profession.

pdf synergy-issue-7.pdf

 
 

New Roles, New Expertise, New Hiring Practices (A. French)

Amanda French, THATCamp Coordinator and Research Assistant Proferssor, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University

pdf 2012-hrsym-pres-french-a-.pdf

 
           

Synergy Issue 6, June 2010

In this issue, 2008-2010 Diversity Scholar, Nicole Branch, writes about her experience visiting the Purdue University Libraries in April of 2009. The event was the fifth time the ARL Diversity Scholars were hosted by Purdue for a ‘research library visit’. Sandra Baker, ARL Career Enhancement (CEP) Fellow in 2009, speaks about the entire fellowship experience, from her first meeting of her cohorts at the ARL Leadership Institute in Denver (January 2009), to the completion of her CEP fellowship last summer. Finally, Leadership and Career Development (LCDP) fellow, Kawanna Bright, from the North Carolina State University Libraries, chronicles the time spent in New Haven, CT and the Yale University Libraries for the Institute on Research, Teaching, and Learning.

pdf synergy-issue-6.pdf

 
 

Research Library Issues, no. 270 (June 2010)

RLI issue 270 includes:

  • Celebrating 10 Years of ARL’s Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce
  • ETDs and Graduate Education: Programs and Prospects
  • Urban Copyright Legends
  • Open Access Week: Library Strategies for Advancing Change
 
       

Research Library Issues, no. 264 (June 2009)

RLI issue 264 includes the following articles:

  • ARL Encourages Members to Refrain from Signing Nondisclosure or Confidentiality Clauses
  • The Case for Regulating Google and the Proposed Book Rights Registry
  • Learning and Research Spaces in ARL Libraries: Snapshots of Installations and Experiments
  • A Different Kind of Conversation: The Sparky Awards and Fresh Views on Change in Scholarly Communication
  • ARL Selects Research Library Leadership Fellows for 2009 10
 
       

Association of Research Libraries: Overview with a Focus on 2001-07

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a not-for-profit membership organization comprising over 120 libraries of North American research institutions. ARL influences the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the diverse communities they serve. ARL pursues this mission by advancing the goals of its member research libraries, providing leadership in public and information policy to the scholarly and higher education communities, fostering the exchange of ideas and expertise, and shaping a future environment that leverages its interests with those of allied organizations. This account of association priorities and activities updates the entries in the first and second editions of the Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science and focuses on the years 2001 to 2007.

pdf arl-overview-2001-2007.pdf

 
 

Synergy Issue 5, February 2008

The fifth issue of Synergy describes two ARL diversity initiatives. Included in this issue are the calls for applications for the Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce and the Leadership and Career Development Program.

pdfsynergy-issue-5.pdf

 
 

Synergy Issue 4, November 2007

The fourth issue of Synergy announces the fourth annual Leadership Institute for MLS graduate students. The Leadership Institute objectives are:
  • provide a theoretical overview of macro-level issues facing research libraries;
  • provide advice on career opportunities in, and transitioning into a research library;
  • develop a community of learners amongst the participants; provide opportunities for both formal and informal mentoring; and
  • provide opportunities to network with ARL library leaders.

pdfsynergy-issue-4.pdf

 
 

Synergy Issue 3, October 2007

This edition of Synergy features the ARL Leadership and Career Development Program (LCDP).  It focuses on the LCDP fellows' experience at the Research, Teaching, and Learning Institute hosted by Joan Giesecke, dean of libraries, and the University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, and Celebrating 10 Years of the LCDP.

pdfsynergy-issue-3.pdf

 
 

Synergy Issue 2, September 2007

In this issue of Synergy, five authors discuss the vital role residency programs have played in the recruitment and professional development of newly credentialed librarians.  The authors are: 

  • Julie Brewer, University of Delaware
  • Marissa Alcorta, Purdue University
  • LaVerne Gray, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Teresa Neely, University of New Mexico
  • Megan Perez, ARL Diversity Scholar

pdfsynergy-issue-2.pdf

 
 

Synergy Issue 1, April 2007

In this inaugural issue of Synergy: News from ARL Diversity Initiatives four participants reflect on their experiences during the ARL Leadership Institute. Bergis Jules, diversity scholar in the Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce, answers the question, "How has the ARL Leadership Institute and Diversity Scholarship impacted my career?" Lyn Batty and Vaishali Jahagirdar, fellows in the ARL Academy, report the highlights of the institute from their perspective. Shannon D. Jones, a Leadership and Career Development Program fellow, describes how the institute reenergized her desire to become a library leader.

pdfsynergy-issue-1.pdf

 
     

Future-Proofing the Research Library: Sarah Thomas Delivers Judith Nadler Vision Lecture

sarah-thomas-and-judith-nadlerSarah Thomas and Judith Nadler, image © American Library AssociationOn May 22, 2014, Sarah Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library and Roy E. Larsen librarian for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard, presented the inaugural Judith Nadler Vision Lecture at the University of Chicago’s Joseph Regenstein Library. Thomas’s lecture, “Future-Proofing the Research Library,” explored the ways in which research libraries are adapting to change. As part of her presentation, she provided an overview of ARL's strategic thinking and design work.

 
 

Edge Initiative for Public Library Technology Assessment Launches

free-to-the-people-on-carnegie-lib-pittsburghimage © JanetandPhilThe Edge Initiative, a new leadership and management tool for libraries that want to improve their public technology services, invites participation by public libraries across the United States. As of January 22, 2014, interested public libraries may sign up via the Edge website.

Participating libraries will use Edge to complete an assessment of their public access technology services. Edge provides additional tools and training for libraries to make improvements and better serve their communities.

 
 

Workforce Transformation: Possible Library Futures

I have held a series of administrative positions at Oklahoma State University (OSU) since 1978 and have been dean of libraries since 2004. During that time we have experienced a number of changes and in 2012 the OSU Library looked to be thriving. We had adopted technology to enhance collections and improve services. We had been a development partner with Summon and were in a similar role with Intota. We consistently received positive survey results and comments for our services and collections. Our building was heavily used by students. For most of my staff and many of my librarians, the library looked healthy and robust. We were clearly not stagnant, but I had a strong sense that many librarians had not yet acknowledged how precarious our future was in research libraries. Staff members who did not have opportunities to attend professional meetings or the time to read the professional literature were unaware of the danger we were in. They did not fully comprehend how the transformations in technology, scholarly communication, and higher education would change their work, nor did they recognize how the competitive challenges from Google and others could make our traditional services irrelevant.

 
 

Workforce Transformation: Adding Value beyond Discovery

For centuries, library work has been about building collections, and then managing them. More recently, the emphasis shifted to discovery and access, which in turn led to an emphasis on instruction and information literacy initiatives. In some sense, one could create a cogent argument that the combination of services and collections will sustain our work for the foreseeable future. However, it also seems that this same argument will not facilitate innovation or necessarily help us provide the much-needed shift to “value beyond discovery.”

 
 

Workforce Transformation: It’s about the Work

When University of Maryland professor of sociology Philip Cohen was asked recently to consult with a graduate student on a journal article revision, the student had two challenges to satisfy his reviewers. The first challenge had to do with the complex use of GIS and geocoding; the reviewers wanted to see a particular deployment of GIS in the student’s US Census tract maps. The second challenge involved the use of census data itself. Professor Cohen easily offered advice on the latter and tried to think where the student could find help with GIS. No need, the graduate student assured him. The student had visited the campus library and gotten exactly the consultation he needed to incorporate GIS in his article revision.
 
 
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