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Library OSP Letter to the House and the Senate re: On-line service providers' liability for copyright infringement (Mar. 30, 1998)

Letter from library and higher education organizations thanking Congressional representatives for their attention to assuring that any statute designed to clarify the limit of an on-line service provider's liability for copyright infringement appropriately accommodates the unique nature of libraries.

pdf hatch-osp-letter-30mar98.pdf

 
 

Testimony Before the U.S. Copyright Office Public Hearing on Distance Education (Feb. 12, 1999)

Comments underscore the need for a change in Section 110(2) "to enable the display and performance of copyrighted works at remote locations at times selected by students" and to ask that "the distinction in current law between types of works that qualify for a distance education performance exemption be eliminated.

pdf hogan-testimony-12feb99.pdf

 
 

Letter to John W. Warner re: Inter-Association Working Group on Government Information Policy (Oct. 17, 1997)

Letter written on behalf of the members of the Inter-Association Working Group on Government Information Policy (IAWG), expressing appreciation for the willingness of John Warner's staff to meet to discuss revisions to Title 44 of the United States Code to enhance public access to government information.

pdf lt-warner-gov-info-policy-17oct97.pdf

 
 

Statement of Barbara J. Ford before the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration On Proposed Revisions to Title 44 of the United States Code

Testimony discusses the library community's comments on the draft "Government Printing Office Act of 1997." Including the key changes to Title 44 that the library community considers necessary in order for the public to be ensured access to federal government information.

pdf ford-statement-title44-apr1997.pdf

 
 

Controversial FIRST Bill Moves Forward

"first" rubber stampOn May 28, 2014, the US House of Representatives Science, Space, and Technology Committee passed the Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science, and Technology (FIRST) Act of 2014, H.R. 4186. The bill seeks to reauthorize sections of the America COMPETES Act relating to the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Office of Science and Technology Policy. The bill is highly controversial and opposed by many organizations and institutions.

 
 

Two Bills Seek to Address NSA Surveillance Practices

phone with sticker that says This Phone Is Tappedimage © François ProulxThe continuous release of information concerning the US National Security Agency’s (NSA) surveillance practices has led to increased scrutiny by Congress. Two bills have been introduced that seek to address some of the NSA surveillance practices and address serious privacy concerns. First, Sen. Feinstein (D-CA) introduced the FISA Improvement Act of 2013 (PDF) that was approved by the Select Committee on Intelligence on October 31. The bill was not made publicly available until after the committee’s approval. The second, a bicameral and bipartisan bill, the USA Freedom Act of 2013 (PDF), was introduced by Rep. Sensenbrenner (R-WI) and Sen. Leahy (D-VT) on October 29. This bill seeks to rein in the NSA’s bulk collection, analysis, and storage of Americans’ electronic communications. ARL with others in the public and private sectors support the USA Freedom Act of 2013.

 
 
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