HomeEventsUpcoming Events ListARL Membership Meeting, Spring 2014Convener and Speaker Bios for Membership Meeting Spring 2014

Convener and Speaker Bios for Membership Meeting Spring 2014

Tuesday, May 6

Strategic Thinking and Design-Research Library in 2033-Vision and Systems of Action-Part One

Moderator

Carol Pitts Diedrichs was named to the newly created position of vice provost and director of University Libraries on July 1, 2013 having served as director of University Libraries since 2010, providing intellectual leadership for the educational and service programs of the University Libraries. A professor of University Libraries, she is responsible for 12 Columbus campus libraries, including the renovated Thompson Library.

Diedrichs began her academic career at the University of Houston before coming to Ohio State in 1987, where she rose through the administrative ranks to become assistant director for collections and technical services. From 2003 to 2009, she was dean of libraries and the William T. Young Endowed Chair at the University of Kentucky. Active in ARL, Diedrichs serves as the current president. She is also a former president of the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS) and also serves as an elected member of the OCLC Global Council. For 13 years, she was editor-in-chief of the journal Library Collections, Acquisitions, and Technical Services. Diedrichs is actively involved in statewide library initiatives and was named one of the 13 founders of the award winning OhioLINK consortium. She currently serves on OhioLINK’s Library Advisory Council. Her work has been recognized by three awards from the American Library Association (ALA), including the 2008 Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award.

Diedrichs earned her BA in library science at Baylor University and her MLIS at the University of Texas at Austin. 

Speakers

Wendy Pradt Lougee is University Librarian and McKnight Presidential Professor at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, a library system that encompasses 13 libraries on the Twin Cities campus. Prior to her appointment at the University of Minnesota in 2002, Lougee held several positions at the University of Michigan over a 20-year period, including director of the Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library and associate director of the University Library for Digital Library Services. Her work in launching and developing a premier digital library program at Michigan was recognized with ALA’s Hugh Atkinson Award (2003), Computerworld Honors Program Laureate (2002), and Michigan’s Walter H. Kaiser Award (2001). She held earlier appointments at Brown University and Wheaton College (Massachusetts).

Lougee has served on the board of directors for the Research Libraries Group (RLG), the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), the Digital Library Federation (DLF) (president 2009), and the National Information Standards Organization (NISO). Current board service includes Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership, ARL (President 2012-2013), and HathiTrust. Her research and publications have focused on digital library development, information economics, assessment of research behavior, virtual organizations, and e-research.

Lougee holds a BA in english from Lawrence University, an MLS from the University of Wisconsin, and an MA in psychology from the University of Minnesota.

Ann Pendleton-Jullian is an architect, writer, and educator whose work explores the interchange between culture, environment, and technology. From a first short career in astrophysics, Pendleton-Jullian has come to see the world through a lens of complexity framed by principles from ecology theory. This, in tandem with a belief that design has the power to take on the complex challenges associated with an emergent highly networked global culture, has led her to work on architecture projects that range in scale and scope from things to systems of action—from a house for the astronomer Carl Sagan to a seven village ecosystem for craft-based tourism in Guizhou province, China—and in domains outside of architecture including patient-centered health, new innovation models for K-12 and higher ed, and human and economic development in marginalized populations.

Pendleton-Jullian is currently distinguished visiting professor at Georgetown University, and professor at The Ohio State University, where she served as director of the School of Architecture. Prior to Ohio State, she was a tenured professor at MIT. She is also a core member of a cross-disciplinary network of global leaders established by the Secretary of Defense to examine questions of emerging interest. As a writer, she has most recently finished a manuscript, “Design Unbound,” with co-author John Seely Brown, that presents a new tool set for designing within complex systems and on complex problems endemic to the 21st century.


Wednesday, May 7

The Library as the Center of Change

Speaker

Edward L. Ayers has been president of the University of Richmond since 2007. He is a noted historian and the author of ten books on the American South. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the National Medal for the Humanities, awarded by President Obama at the White House in the summer of 2013. He has also won the Bancroft Prize for distinguished writing in American History and the Beveridge Prize for the best book in English on the history of the Americas since 1492 as well being named a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. Ayers’ digital archive project, The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War, has been used in thousands of classrooms around the world, and he works closely with the Digital Scholarship Lab at UR on a digital atlas of American history, funded by a large grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Ayers is also a co-host of BackStory, a nationally syndicated radio show that ties history to the present day.

Ayers is an accomplished teacher. In 2003, he was awarded the National Professor of the Year from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, and he annually teaches an undergraduate seminar for first-year students.


Building a 21st Century Research and Teaching Infrastructure

Moderator

James (Jim) L. Mullins has been the dean of libraries and Esther Ellis Norton Professor of Library Science at Purdue University Libraries since 2004. Prior to his appointment at Purdue, he served as associate director for administration at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Libraries. Earlier, he held administrative/faculty positions at Villanova University and Indiana University. Mullins received BA and MALS degrees from the University of Iowa and a PhD from Indiana University.

Mullins has been active professionally within ACRL, ARL, IFLA, and IATUL. He has been recognized as a leader in advancing research libraries and their roles within e-science, scholarly communication, and space use, along with redefining how the work of a librarian must change and evolve within the research university environment.

Speakers

In early 2014, David Gift joined Internet2 as associate vice president for community engagement. Gift is also vice provost emeritus for libraries and IT services, CIO, and adjunct assistant professor of radiology at Michigan State University. After retiring from MSU and just prior to joining Internet2, Gift served as vice president for strategic initiatives at Merit Network, Inc., Michigan’s high-speed research and education network, and the oldest such network in the United States.

Gift served MSU previously as assistant vice president for integrative management, assistant chairperson of radiology, interim director of strategy and implementation for MSU’s Faculty Group Practice, and management consultant to the president, provost, vice president for finance and operations, and deans. He has served as a founder and member of the Board of Directors of four University joint venture corporations: Mid-Michigan MRI, University Rehabilitation Alliance, Radiation Oncology Alliance, and Great Lakes Cancer Institute. Gift also helped to start and served as a member of the executive committee of the Great Lakes Health Information Exchange.

Gift currently is a member of the board and executive committee (treasurer) of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) where he also advises CLIR’s post-doctoral programs. He also serves as a member of the board of directors of Peckham Vocational Industries (Lansing, MI). He holds degrees in physics (BS) and computer science (MS) from Michigan State University, and is an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow (SM) of the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Rebecca Graham is the chief information officer and chief librarian at the University of Guelph. Prior to her appointment in 2012, she worked in the libraries of Harvard University. She began tenure in 2003 as associate director for library operations at the Countway Library of Medicine. She also served as a co-director of Countway before moving to the Harvard College Library (HCL) in 2006. In the College Library, Rebecca served as the associate librarian for preservation, digitization, and administrative services. Prior to Harvard, Graham’s academic library experience includes responsibilities for library IT and the digital library program at Johns Hopkins University. She served as the interim director and program associate for the Digital Library Federation (DLF). She also served as manager of integrated library systems at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Before receiving her MLS, Graham’s experience includes management of the Johnson County (Kansas) Public Library’s integrated library system, help desk manager and application programmer at the Springfield, Ohio Navistar manufacturing plant, and senior computer operator at Wright State University.

Graham earned a BS in organizational management at Wilberforce University and an MLIS from UIUC. She was a member of the inaugural cohort in ARL’s RLLF program and has been recognized by the UIUC Graduate School of Library and Information Science with both the Jane B. and Robert B. Downs Professional Promise Award and the Library School Alumni Association Leadership Award.


Strategic Thinking and Design-Research Library in 2033-Vision and Systems of Action-Part Two

Moderators

Ann Pendleton-Jullian is an architect, writer, and educator whose work explores the interchange between culture, environment, and technology. From a first short career in astrophysics, Pendleton-Jullian has come to see the world through a lens of complexity framed by principles from ecology theory. This, in tandem with a belief that design has the power to take on the complex challenges associated with an emergent highly networked global culture, has led her to work on architecture projects that range in scale and scope from things to systems of action—from a house for the astronomer Carl Sagan to a seven village ecosystem for craft-based tourism in Guizhou province, China—and in domains outside of architecture including patient-centered health, new innovation models for K-12 and higher ed, and human and economic development in marginalized populations.

Pendleton-Jullian is currently distinguished visiting professor at Georgetown University, and professor at The Ohio State University, where she served as director of the School of Architecture. Prior to Ohio State, she was a tenured professor at MIT. She is also a core member of a cross-disciplinary network of global leaders established by the Secretary of Defense to examine questions of emerging interest. As a writer, she has most recently finished a manuscript, “Design Unbound,” with co-author John Seely Brown, that presents a new tool set for designing within complex systems and on complex problems endemic to the 21st century.

Elliott Shore has served as executive director of ARL since January 1, 2013. From 1997 to 2012, Shore served as the Constance A. Jones director of libraries and professor of history at Bryn Mawr College. In 2002, he was appointed CIO of the college. Before arriving at Bryn Mawr, Shore was director of the Historical Studies-Social Science Library at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey, from 1985 to 1997. In 1974, Shore began his career in libraries at Temple University as curator of the Contemporary Culture Collection and in 1982, was appointed history bibliographer, reference librarian, and assistant to the director, a position he held through 1984. Shore has been a leader in the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship in Academic Libraries program since its inception in 2003 and a CLIR Senior Presidential Fellow since 2008. He served as a co-dean of the Frye Leadership Institute in 2012.


Thursday, May 8

The SHARE Initiative – Value and Importance to Universities

Moderator

Richard E. (Rick) Luce is the dean of university libraries, professor and Peggy V. Helmerich chair, and associate vice president for research at the University of Oklahoma (OU). Prior to joining OU, Luce was vice-provost and director of libraries at Emory University, responsible for University Libraries and the Health Sciences Library from 2006 to 2012. From 1991 to 2006, he was the director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Research Library, which was recognized as “the world’s best scientific digital library” in 2005. Rick was awarded the Fellows’ Prize for Leadership at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2005, the first ever awarded to a nonscientist.

Luce has served on four NSF Blue Ribbon panels in data-driven science, cyber-infrastructure, and the role of research libraries, and he was a member of the National Academies Committee on Assuring the Integrity of Research Data in an Era of E-Science. Currently, he serves on the ARL Board of Directors, the DataONE external advisory board, and Stanford’s University Libraries and Academic Information Resources Advisory Council. In 1999, Luce was a co-founder of the Open Archives Initiative to develop interoperable standards for author self-archiving systems. In 2003, he co-organized the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities and, in 2004, the Brazilian Declaration on Open Access.

From 2000 to 2006, Luce was the senior advisor to the Max Planck Society’s Center for Information Management and has also held positions as the first executive director of the Southeast Florida Library Information Network (SEFLIN), director of Colorado’s Irving Library Network, and assistant director of the Boulder Public Library. Luce earned his BA in political science from the University of San Diego, MPA from San Diego State University, and MLIS from the University of South Florida.

Speakers

Kelvin K. Droegemeier was appointed vice president for research at the University of Oklahoma in 2009. He joined the University of Oklahoma in 1985 as an assistant professor of meteorology, was tenured and promoted to associate professor in July 1991 and promoted to professor in 1998. In 1989, he co-founded the National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center (STC) for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS) and served for five years as its deputy director. He directed CAPS from 1994 until 2006, and today CAPS is recognized around the world as the pioneer of storm-scale numerical weather prediction. In 2003, Dr. Droegemeier co-founded the NSF Engineering Research Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) and served for several years as its deputy director. He earned a BS with Special Distinction in meteorology in 1980 from the University of Oklahoma and MS and PhD degrees in atmospheric science in 1982 and 1985, respectively, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

In 2004, Droegemeier was appointed by President George W. Bush to a 6-year term on the National Science Board, the governing body of the NSF that also provides science policy guidance to the Congress and President. He chaired the Board’s Committee on Programs and Plans and served on or chaired several task forces, including those on hurricane science and engineering, transformative research, cost sharing, and NSB nominations. In 2010, Dr. Droegemeier was nominated by President Barack Obama for a second term on the National Science Board and was confirmed by the Senate in 2011 for a six-year term ending in 2016. He was elected in 2012 for a two-year term as vice-chairman of the National Science Board.

Clifford A. Lynch, has led the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) as the executive director since 1997. CNI, jointly sponsored by ARL and EDUCAUSE, includes about 200 member organizations concerned with the intelligent uses of information technology and networked information to enhance scholarship and intellectual life. CNI’s wide-ranging agenda includes work in digital preservation, data intensive scholarship, teaching, learning and technology, and infrastructure and standards development.

Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last ten as director of library automation. Lynch, who holds a PhD in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at Berkeley’s School of Information. He is both a past president and recipient of the Award of Merit of the American Society for Information and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Information Standards Organization.

In 2011, he was appointed co-chair of the National Academies Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI), and he serves on numerous advisory boards and visiting committees. His work has been recognized by the ALA’s Lippincott Award, the EDUCAUSE Leadership Award in Public Policy and Practice, and the American Society for Engineering Education’s Homer Bernhardt Award.

John C. Vaughn was appointed executive vice president of the Association of American Universities (AAU) in 1996 and, prior to that appointment, has served in several positions of increasing responsibility since joining the association in 1980. The AAU consists of sixty US and two Canadian universities with strong programs of research and graduate and professional education. As executive vice president, Vaughn serves as deputy to the president and chief operating officer. He also serves as director of policy studies, supervising the association’s work in developing national and institutional policies that support the missions of the member universities. He has specific responsibilities for association activities in the areas of intellectual property, information technology, research libraries, and scholarly communication. He works with member presidents and chancellors, chief academic officers, and other university administrators in addressing these areas. In promoting national policies, he works closely with government relations representatives to advance appropriate and effective federal legislation and regulations in the support of academic programs and activities.

Vaughn staffs a number of AAU committees, including Intellectual Property/Information Technology, Institutional Data, and Membership, and coordinates the annual meeting of the AAU chief academic officers. He has been an active member to the Joint Committee of the Higher Education Communities since its formation in December 2002.

Vaughn received his BA in psychology from Eastern Washington State College and his PhD in experimental psychology from the University of Minnesota. He was awarded a NIH Postdoctoral Traineeship and served as a postdoctoral fellow at Duke University.

Organizing for New Work - ARL and Libraries

Speakers

Merrill P. Schwartz is the vice president for AGB Consulting for the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges. Schwartz’s primary responsibilities include managing a consulting practice of governance experts serving AGB member colleges, universities, systems, and foundations. As a member of AGB’s leadership team, she contributes to achieving the organization’s strategic goals. Previously, Schwartz served as the director of research for AGB and was responsible for conducting research on and writing about trusteeship, governance, and the academic presidency. She also managed book projects and conferences, and served as the liaison to AGB’s Board Professionals Leadership Group, a corps of volunteers that works with AGB to address the professional development needs of its members. Prior to joining AGB, Schwartz worked for almost a decade as a faculty member, director of institutional relations, and director of internships at The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars. Schwartz earned BA and MPA degrees from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and a PhD in higher education administration and leadership from the University of Maryland. The subject of her dissertation was Assessing the Performance of Academic Presidents.

James F. Wynn II is a principal with Quatt Associates. Wynn specializes in compensation and employee benefit plans. He works with a number of foundations, media organizations, advocacy groups, professional societies, and educational institutions in the areas of executive compensation, deferred compensation arrangements, staff compensation systems and structures, and employee benefit plan design.

Prior to joining Quatt Associates, Wynn was an associate in the employee benefits and executive compensation practice group of Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP. As a lawyer with the firm, Wynn assisted numerous for-profit and not-for-profit clients in finding and implementing creative solutions to their compensation and employee-benefit-related business problems. Wynn's experience ranges from qualified retirement plans and deferred compensation arrangements to employment agreements and severance pay agreements.

Wynn is a graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law and Cornell University's School of Industrial and Labor Relations, where he studied human resource management and organizational behavior. He is a member of both the Virginia State Bar and the District of Columbia Bar.

 

 
 
 

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