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White v. West Publishing 2014 Decision

In July 2014, the district court issued its full memorandum and order in White v. West Publishing, explaining that three of four fair use factors weighed in favor of a finding of fair use while the remaining factor was neutral. 

pdfWhite-v-west-publishing-decision-3jul2014.pdf

 
 

Authors Guild v. HathiTrust Decision (June 2014)

On June 10, 2014, the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit affirmed the lower court decision in Authors Guild v. HathiTrust in favor of HathiTrust Digital Library. 

pdfagvhathitrust-decision-jun2014.pdf

 
 

LCA Amicus Brief in Authors Guild v. Google, Inc. Appeal

On July 8, 2014, the Library Copyright Association filed an amicus brief for Authors Guild v. Google, Inc. in the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

pdfamicus-GoogleBooksAppeal-final-8jul2014.pdf

 

 
 

Garcia v. Google Amicus Brief

In April 2014, the Association of Research Libraries signed on to the Garcia v. Google amicus brief. In the brief, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) urges a federal appeals court to reconsider its decision to order Google to take down a controversial video while a copyright lawsuit is pending as the decision sets a dangerous precedent that could have disastrous consequences for free speech.

April 11, 2014 EFF Press Release

pdf amicus-brief-garcia-vs-google-15apr2014.pdf

 
 

Fisher v. University of Texas Amicus Brief (Oct. 2013)

On October 31, 2013, ARL joined more than 40 associations in signing this amicus brief in support of the University of Texas in its appeal of the ruling in Fisher v. University of Texas. The case challenges the affirmative action admissions policy of the University of Texas.

pdf amicus-fisher-v-university-of-texas-31oct13.pdf

 
 

Letter from US Department of Justice Declining to File Amicus Brief in Cambridge University Press v. Mark Becker (Feb. 22, 2013)

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) decided not to participate in the appeal of the case Cambridge University Press v. Mark Becker as amicus curiae. The case concerns the use at Georgia State University (GSU) of electronic course reserves (e-reserves) and electronic course sites to make excerpts from academic books available online to students enrolled in particular courses. It was widely reported that the US Copyright Office requested that the DOJ file an amicus brief either on the side of the publishers or as a neutral party. On February 22, 2013, the DOJ sent this letter to the court stating that the US Attorney General had decided not to file an amicus brief in the case.

pdf ltr-doj-re-gsu-ereserves-22feb13.pdf

 
 

Motion by US Department of Justice to Extend Time in Which to File Amicus Brief in Cambridge University Press v. Mark Becker

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) is evaluating whether to participate in the appeal of the case Cambridge University Press v. Mark Becker as amicus curiae. The case concerns the use at Georgia State University (GSU) of electronic course reserves (e-reserves) and electronic course sites to make excerpts from academic books available online to students enrolled in particular courses. It was widely reported that the US Copyright Office requested that the DOJ file an amicus brief either on the side of the publishers or as a neutral party. On January 25, 2013, the DOJ requested an extension of the time they have to file an amicus brief.

pdf gsu-extension-motion-usgov-jan2013.pdf

 
 

Voluntary Consensus Standards and in Conformity Assessment Activities

This memo summarizes the key rulings in the Georgia State University (GSU) lawsuit and discusses some possible consequences for libraries generally.

pdf memo_gsudirectors_15may12.pdf

 
 

Golan v. Holder: A Farewell to Constitutional Challenges to Copyright Laws

On January 13, 2012, the Supreme Court by a 6-2 vote affirmed the Tenth Circuit decision in Golan v. Holder. The case concerned the constitutionality of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (URAA), which restored copyright in foreign works that had entered into the public domain because the copyright owners had failed to comply with formalities such as notice; or because the U.S. did not have copyright treaties in place with the country at the time the work was created (e.g., the Soviet Union)

pdf golan_summary_06feb12.pdf

 
   
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